Privacy Protection Letter April 2017

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1 April 2017

Dear Senator(s):

On 23 March 2017, the United States Senate voted to block the implementation of new regulations relating to “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” (81 Fed. Reg. 87274 (December 2, 2016) by the Federal Communications Commission. These regulations would have prevented Internet Service Providers (ISPs) from collecting and selling the personal information of their customers to third parties without first receiving permission from their customers to do so. Specifically, ISPs would have had to obtain explicit permission from customers before sharing sensitive information such as geolocation, health information and social security numbers, while customers would have been provided with the ability to opt-out of sharing non-sensitive information such as email addresses. In addition, ISPs would have been required to enact stronger security measures and to inform customers promptly when a breach of their data had occurred. In short, these regulations would have strengthened privacy protections and provided individual Internet users with greater control over the use of their personal data.

By preventing the implementation of these regulations, the United States Senate has struck a blow against Internet privacy and the rights of Internet users. The Transhuman National Committee of the United States strongly supports individual privacy and the freedom to utilize technology in one's own life as one sees fit. As stated in our platform, we oppose “all forms of mass surveillance and any intrusion by governmental or private institutions upon non-coercive activities that an individual has chosen to retain within his or her private sphere.” In the modern world, the ability to use the Internet is as important to commerce, education and networking as the use of highways or public libraries was to previous generations. To ask for individuals to choose between their privacy and their ability to partake in modern life is indefensible.

While we do not object per se to companies utilizing a user's personal data to provide a better product or experience to their customers, and are aware of the competitive pressures in the ISP space, we note that the decision made by the United States Senate is reflected in neither the spirit of our founding documents, nor the United Nations Human Rights Council, nor in other advanced nations, some of which have defined broadband access as a basic right. It is therefore our firm position that an individual's data belongs first and foremost to them, and that any use of that data by third parties, including but not limited to ISPs, can be performed only with the express consent of the individual. Just as we would not stand for companies or governments placing cameras in our living rooms without our consent, we cannot and will not accept the non-consensual collecting and selling of an individual's Internet activities.

We ask the United States Senate to reconsider its decision and allow these regulations to take effect. In so doing, the Senate will be helping to achieve a just and secure Internet for all.

Sincerely;


David J Kelley

Transhuman National Committee Chair

For and on behalf of and as directed by:

TNC Executive Committee and TNC Board of Directors


1 April 2017

Dear Representative(s):

On 23 March 2017, the United States House of Representatives voted to block the implementation of new regulations relating to “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” (81 Fed. Reg. 87274 (December 2, 2016) by the Federal Communications Commission. These regulations would have prevented Internet Service Providers (ISPs) from collecting and selling the personal information of their customers to third parties without first receiving permission from their customers to do so. Specifically, ISPs would have had to obtain explicit permission from customers before sharing sensitive information such as geolocation, health information and social security numbers, while customers would have been provided with the ability to opt-out of sharing non-sensitive information such as email addresses. In addition, ISPs would have been required to enact stronger security measures and to inform customers promptly when a breach of their data had occurred. In short, these regulations would have strengthened privacy protections and provided individual Internet users with greater control over the use of their personal data.

By preventing the implementation of these regulations, the United States House of Representatives has struck a blow against Internet privacy and the rights of Internet users. The Transhuman National Committee of the United States strongly supports individual privacy and the freedom to utilize technology in one's own life as one sees fit. As stated in our platform, we oppose “all forms of mass surveillance and any intrusion by governmental or private institutions upon non-coercive activities that an individual has chosen to retain within his or her private sphere.” In the modern world, the ability to use the Internet is as important to commerce, education and networking as the use of highways or public libraries was to previous generations. To ask for individuals to choose between their privacy and their ability to partake in modern life is indefensible.

While we do not object per se to companies utilizing a user's personal data to provide a better product or experience to their customers, and are aware of the competitive pressures in the ISP space, we note that the decision made by the United States House of Representatives is reflected in neither the spirit of our founding documents, nor the United Nations Human Rights Council, nor in other advanced nations, some of which have defined broadband access as a basic right. It is therefore our firm position that an individual's data belongs first and foremost to them, and that any use of that data by third parties, including but not limited to ISPs, can be performed only with the express consent of the individual. Just as we would not stand for companies or governments placing cameras in our living rooms without our consent, we cannot and will not accept the non-consensual collecting and selling of an individual's Internet activities.

We ask the United States House of Representatives to reconsider its decision and allow these regulations to take effect. In so doing, the House will be helping to achieve a just and secure Internet for all.

Sincerely;


David J Kelley

Transhuman National Committee Chair

For and on behalf of and as directed by:

TNC Executive Committee and TNC Board of Directors


1 April 2017

Dear Mr. President:

The United States Senate and House of Representatives have recently voted to block the implementation of new regulations relating to “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” (81 Fed. Reg. 87274 (December 2, 2016) by the Federal Communications Commission. These regulations would have prevented Internet Service Providers (ISPs) from collecting and selling the personal information of their customers to third parties without first receiving permission from their customers to do so. Specifically, ISPs would have had to obtain explicit permission from customers before sharing sensitive information such as geolocation, health information and social security numbers, while customers would have been provided with the ability to opt-out of sharing non-sensitive information such as email addresses. In addition, ISPs would have been required to enact stronger security measures and to inform customers promptly when a breach of their data had occurred. In short, these regulations would have strengthened privacy protections and provided individual Internet users with greater control over the use of their personal data.

By preventing the implementation of these regulations, the United States Congress has struck a blow against Internet privacy and the rights of Internet users. The Transhuman National Committee of the United States strongly supports individual privacy and the freedom to utilize technology in one's own life as one sees fit. As stated in our platform, we oppose “all forms of mass surveillance and any intrusion by governmental or private institutions upon non-coercive activities that an individual has chosen to retain within his or her private sphere.” In the modern world, the ability to use the Internet is as important to commerce, education and networking as the use of highways or public libraries was to previous generations. To ask for individuals to choose between their privacy and their ability to partake in modern life is indefensible.

While we do not object per se to companies utilizing a user's personal data to provide a better product or experience to their customers, and are aware of the competitive pressures in the ISP space, we note that the decision made by the United States Congress is reflected in neither the spirit of our founding documents, nor the United Nations Human Rights Council, nor in other advanced nations, some of which have defined broadband access as a basic right. It is therefore our firm position that an individual's data belongs first and foremost to them, and that any use of that data by third parties, including but not limited to ISPs, can be performed only with the express consent of the individual. Just as we would not stand for companies or governments placing cameras in our living rooms without our consent, we cannot and will not accept the non-consensual collecting and selling of an individual's Internet activities.

We ask that you reconsider your decision and allow these regulations to take effect. In so doing, you will be helping to achieve a just and secure Internet for all.

Sincerely;


David J Kelley

Transhuman National Committee Chair

For and on behalf of and as directed by:

TNC Executive Committee and TNC Board of Directors